Art Critiques

Defining Art Criticism

Sunday: Developing an Artistic Eye and How-to Critiques

Art criticism and critiques does not mean you are mean or tearing apart an artist’s work but rather responding to, interpreting meaning, and making critical judgments about specific pieces of work. Criticism is often associated with negative connotations.

There are four parts of an art criticism.

This week we will start with the first part of an art critique…..

The first part is the description…..which tries to answer the question                         “What do you see?”

  • Type of art (sculpture, architecture, painting, or other forms of art)
  • Medium used (oil paint, bronze, clay, or stone) and the tools used to create it
  • Size and scale
  • Elements of art and general shapes
  • Color palette/scheme
  • Texture of the surface
  • Context of the piece (when and where was it created)


Take for example Oriental Poppies by Georgia O’Keeffe in 1928. oriental-poppies

  • Type of art  — It is a painting.
  • Medium used — Oil painting.
  • Size and scale — 30″ by 40″.
  • Elements of art and general shapes — vibrant reds and oranges create shades and dimension with white and black for contrast. There is lots of movement created by shades and highlights on both flowers. No background. Creates a look of an up-close photograph.
  • Color palette/scheme — warm color palette of red and orange with white and black accents.
  • Texture of the surface — velvety finish.
  • Context of the piece (when and where was it created) — No background takes away any possible context of where the piece was created. She wanted people to slow down and look at just the beauty of flowers. She is known for her abstract paintings.

I have always loved and admired her flower paintings. I enjoy her bold use of color and by removing any background it allows the flowers as the true focal point.

Sources:

Oriental Poppies by Georgia O’Keeffe

Art Criticism

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